Modular vs. Broadloom Carpet

This week we got to decide on the pattern of our new modular carpet. Modular carpet is most commonly called carpet squares or carpet tiles. They come in just as many different designs as regular broadloom carpets. The following reasons are why modular carpet is more suitable for our space.

  • Easier handling and installation
  • Additional designs because of installation patterns
  • Better maintenance
  • Water resistant padding
  • Environmentally friendly

Modular carpet is typically offered in two sizes, 18″ X 18″ or 24″ X 24″. This means they can stack and ship modular carpet in boxes. One installation man can unload and move these boxes. Broadloom carpets are often shipped on rolls that are 12′ – 15′ long and 3′ – 5′ wide. This requires at least 2 installation men to unload and move. At the top of this blog is a picture of our two installation patterns. Modular carpet squares typically have many different installation patterns (above is an example of installation patterns for a carpet). Maintenance is also much easier for modular carpets. If there is a spilled drink in the classroom, the carpet that is effected can be pulled up and replaced. The replacement of a few squares of carpet is much cheaper than pulling up an entire room of carpet. Also the backing on modular carpet is made of vinyl. This protects the sub floor from water. In the long run there will be less deterioration or mold underneath our carpets. And lastly, modular carpet is typically made of recycled material and tiles in good condition can be relocated and reused making it more environmentally friendly than broadloom carpet.

Without any further ado, our room is coming together beautifully. The carpet was installed and now the room is looking more complete. I can’t wait until we get our technology and furniture in the rooms. Please enjoy the pictures!

 

Introducing Emily Jones & Construction Update

I am pleased to introduce the newest member of our GPC crew, Emily Jones! Emily was previously employed as our student assistant and returns as a replacement for Kristina Lusk. Kristina’s tenure with ASFR will end August 29th, as she leaves to finish her Master’s degree. Emily is graduating in May 2015 from TTU with her Bachelor of Interior Design. Please help us welcome Emily!

Hello, I am Emily Jones. I am very excited to start working at ASFR. I loved my time as a student assistant. Now, I am so excited to be starting ASFR full time. Yesterday, Kristina and I checked on construction. Our  new ceiling grid has been installed and all the zoned lighting is working. The new ceiling is dropped from the original height; however, because of the white tile the ceiling still seems high. The two toned colors on the wall also make the room feel spacious. Three holes were cored in the floor for power, one for the technology cabinet and the other two for students use. This option was chosen due to the furniture selection. This room is intended to be mobile with tables and chairs that can be configured for the specific pedagogy of the classes. Having the wires concealed underneath the floor reduces hassle and hazard of cable management on the floor. As a student assistant I visited the room before construction had started. I was so excited to see the progress from the past few months.

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Zoned Lighting

The lighting has been wired and zoned to allow flexibility with the amount of lighting in the room. There are four different zones available:

1. All lights on;

2. Center bulb of fixtures off, two outer bulbs of fixture on;

3. Center bulb of fixtures on, two outer bulbs of fixture off;

4. All lights off.

These zones are different than the ones normally found in GPCs. Since this room is for seminar/discussion style classes, there is not a need for the front row of lights to be off while the back sets are on and vice versa. This will allow for some different options while still providing adequate lighting to all areas of the rooms.

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Painting & Lights

Paint is complete and looks really nice. The colors selected are greyish blue; something different than the norm of previous renovations. The ceiling grids have also been installed and the Electric Shop is working on wiring the new lighting. Without lighting, it was hard to get clear pictures, but these will give you a general idea. Hopefully next week we can get pictures with a fully lighted room!

 

LAST WEEK

LAST WEEK

 

THIS WEEK

THIS WEEK

Construction is Underway

Construction on the new platinum GPCs has begun. The rooms have been stripped of all existing furniture, whiteboards, chair rail, and technology. Today the painters were prepping the walls for some color. Once complete, the new ceiling grid with lighting will be installed. Check out the slideshow below for this week’s images!

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Polycom CX5500 (Videoconferencing) Survey

We are finalizing plans for the summer renovations of the seminar rooms. Under consideration is the installation of a Polycom CX5500 for interactive distance education. This videoconferencing technology would allow instructors to meet with students who are at a distance, students to interact with an instructor at a distance, or even bring a guest speaker from anywhere in the world without the expense of travel. Today a survey was distributed to TTU faculty regarding their current and potential use of this technology. So far, the responses are in favor of this addition and many faculty are excited by the potential of this technology. Complete survey results to come!

For more information on the videoconferencing technology under consideration, visit http://www.polycom.com/products-services/products-for-microsoft/lync-optimized/cx5500-unified-conference-station.html.

6 Weeks & Counting

Renovations on the new GPC seminar rooms begin in 6 weeks! Once renovations begin, our blog readers will receive weekly construction updates complete with pictures! Here is a look at the “befores”; get excited about the “afters”!

 

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